ESS Speed Mentoring Event – in Toronto!

Speed Mentoring is for YOU! See you there!

Dear members of the Environmental Studies Section,

We look forward to seeing many of you at the ISA convention in Toronto 2019!

On this occasion, we call all grad students, post-docs, assistant professors and those recently post-tenure:  ESS Speed-Mentoring (Saturday, March 30, 2019 1:45 PM – 3:30 PM) is for you!

Do you want to have chats with senior scholars on issues related to teaching, publishing, applying for jobs, or getting ready for tenure ? Here is your opportunity.

Evan J. Ringquist Best Paper Award, American Political Science Association

Congratulations to ESS Member Dr. Jonas Meckling (University of California, Berkeley) and Dr. Jonas Nahm (Johns Hopkins University) for winning the Evan J. Ringquist Best Paper Award for their 2018 paper, “The power of process: State capacity and climate policy” in Governance.

The award recognizes the best paper published in a relevant journal in the last two years and is awarded by The Science, Technology, & Environmental Politics section of the American Political Science Association.

Textbook on Intl Political Economy by ESS member Miller published by Routledge

Miller, R.C. (2018). International political economy: Contrasting world views (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Routledge.

In his new textbook, political economist Ray Miller analyzes the environment as one of the major global issues from three perspectives: free market, institutionalist, and Marxist. The institutionalist section includes ecological economist Herman Daly’s critique of neoclassical economics and top proposals from Paul Hawken’s plan to reverse global warming.

OPEN ACCESS book by ESS members – Governing climate change: Polycentricity in action?

Jordan, A., Huitema, D., van Asselt, H., & Forster, J. (Eds.). (2018). Governing climate change: Polycentricity in action?. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

Climate change governance is in a state of enormous flux. New and more dynamic forms of governing are appearing around the international climate regime centred on the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). They appear to be emerging spontaneously from the bottom up, producing a more dispersed pattern of governing, which Nobel Laureate Elinor Ostrom famously described as ‘polycentric’. This book brings together contributions from some of the world’s foremost experts to provide the first systematic test of the ability of polycentric thinking to explain and enhance societal attempts to govern climate change. It is ideal for researchers in public policy, international relations, environmental science, environmental management, politics, law and public administration. It will also be useful on advanced courses in climate policy and governance, and for practitioners seeking incisive summaries of developments in particular sub-areas and sectors. This title is also available as Open Access on Cambridge Core.