Fifth edition of Global Gender Politics by ESS author Anne Sisson Runyan

Runyan, A.S. (Forthcoming 2019). Global gender politics. New York, NY: Routledge.

Global Gender Politics analyzes the gendered divisions of power, labor, and resources that contribute to the global crises of representation, violence, and sustainability. The author emphasizes how hard-won attention to gender and other related inequalities in world affairs is simultaneously being jeopardized by new and old authoritarianisms and depoliticized through reducing gender to a binary and a problem-solving tool in global governance. The author examines gendered insecurities produced by the pursuit of international security and gendered injustices in the global political economy and sees promise in transnational struggles for global justice.

New book from Fuzuo Wu from Aalborg University, Denmark

Wu, F. (2018). Energy and climate policies in China and India: A two-level comparative study. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

The book explores the proactive and reactive features of China and India’s domestic and foreign policies to address two intertwined challenges: first, China and India have taken policy measures that accord with their own domestic priorities; second, both countries have had to alter the trajectory of their proactive policy measures as a result of external pressures. The book argues that China and India’s proactive and reactive policy measures to address energy insecurity and climate change have been shaped by their two-level pressures. At the domestic/unit level, both countries have had to sustain fast economic growth and eradicate poverty in order to maximize their economic wealth. At the international/systemic level, both countries have sought to enhance their great power status in the international system which is characterized by not only asymmetrical interdependence but also global governance in general, and global energy and climate governance in particular.

Green Keynesianism and the global financial crisis by ESS author Kyla Tienhaara

Tienhaara, K. (2018). Green Keynesianism and the global financial crisis. New York, NY: Routledge.

It is widely accepted that limiting climate change to 2°C will require substantial and sustained investments in low-carbon technologies and infrastructure. However, the dominance of market fundamentalism in economic thinking for the past three decades has meant that governments have generally viewed large spending programs as politically undesirable. In this context, the Global Financial Crisis (GFC) represented a huge opportunity for proponents of public investment in environmental projects or “Green Keynesianism”.